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Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and risk of cardiovascular events and mortality: a prospective study (23/01/2020)

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and risk of cardiovascular events and mortality: a prospective study (23/01/2020)

Amra Jujić, Naeimeh Atabaki-Pasdar, Peter M. Nilsson, Peter Almgren, Liisa Hakaste, Tiinamaija Tuomi, Lisa M. Berglund, Paul W. Franks, Jens J. Holst, Rashmi B. Prasad, Signe S. Torekov, Susana Ravassa, Javier Díez, Margaretha Persson, Olle Melander, Maria F. Gomez, Leif Groop, Emma Ahlqvist, Martin Magnusson

Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue therapy has proven to be beneficial for cardiovascular protection. On the contrary, evidence that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) and/or the GIP receptor (GIPR) have untoward effects on cardiovascular biology has recently emerged. In this issue, Jujić et al (https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-020-05093-9) report that, in two prospective, community-based studies, elevated levels of fasting GIP were associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease-associated and total mortality within 5–9 years of follow-up. Further, Mendelian randomisation analyses provided novel evidence of the involvement of GIP in coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. The authors suggest osteopontin to be the mediator of the possible detrimental cardiovascular effects of GIP, and call for a more thorough investigation of the potential risks associated with pharmacological stimulation of the GIP pathway.

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